The Rest of the Story

So, I’m at the point in my web serial where I can either continue to post, or wrap up the online portion. My latest work-in-progress, Hard as Roxx, also started as a serial. But due to spotty readership and my unhappiness in posting a 1st draft, I turned it into a novel. Two drafts later, and it’s my favorite book.

Similarly, while eating lunch today, I had a gust of insight as to the rest of the story line for Skip Tracer. As one might expect, it will be a mystery with quite a bit of romantic intrigue, as well as cross-country (or beyond) manhunt, with a few other twists thrown in. Being naturally twisted, plot turns come easily for me.

I am already about a month ahead in the writing, given the posting frequency, and I can continue to lay out the story here, as my 1st draft, or I can just focus on writing. Doing a web serial is a bit like washing your underwear in public. People are bound to see some stuff you didn’t want to show. However, I think it forces me to try to keep the pacing quick and the story tight; plus, it gives folks a chance to see my writing style, and perhaps buy my books. (I’ll be releasing 2 in paperback later this year.)

Anyway, feedback is welcome. I have the usual blog dilemma: people “like” who don’t read and others read but don’t interact. If no one cares, I’d just as soon use the energy elsewhere, so let me know what you think. I’d still like this to be an interactive exercise.

So what do think: keep it a web serial or switch to writing a book?

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10 thoughts on “The Rest of the Story

  1. B.J Jnr, there is only one reason for doing anything (not true but it sounds good) and that is because you want to.
    Writing is such a personal thing, and blogging is about as weird as you want it to be.
    Writing books (it seems to me) is about reaching a specific audience. You need to reach enough of them to make a buck so you have to write a certain way.
    Blogging might be about sharing something with only a few people.
    How big an audience do you need?
    For a long time I wrote for a potential audience of 6000, but I actually had no idea how many of those people read my stuff, let alone liked it.
    With blogging I have a mix of ‘likes’ and ‘reads’ which gives me a bit of an idea of how I’m going. For me it beats the hell out of 6000 faceless dudes who may, or may not like what I read.
    For a long time my ‘known audience’ consisted of three people. I’m like every other creative person, I like people to like what I do, but I have to say that I enjoyed the fact that these three people ‘always’ liked what I wrote, and I have to keep reminding myself that for a time that was enough for me. It is a really big deal to have even one person who keeps coming back and enjoying your stuff.
    Terry.
    P.S. Thank you for all the likes.

    1. Terry, thanks for the feedback. I really appreciate your taking the time. I’ve actually reached the point in writing that I’m not even sure I care if my books are sold. I’ve made no effort to publish the latest one, for instance. The main reason I asked the question now, is that it’s early in the process, and I’m still not sure the idea of a web serial works. I blog, as much as anything, so I can learn from the interactions with people. I honestly don’t care much about numbers.

      What I’m finding weird about a web serial is that it’s pieces of stuff, and writing this way is BRAND NEW to me. So, as much as anything, I’m trying to figure out if this is working, or whether I need to learn and change something.

  2. Allyson Mellone

    Bill, I’ve read every story posted for “Skip Tracer.” I spend my down time reading in a mode I call “physical reading.” I know, it’s getting to be so un-modern to read a book, but holding and turning the pages of a book makes me a part of what I am reading. I have learned to read serials online. I am currently enjoying “Skip Tracer.” To finish it, I would read it in book format if you decide to turn the story into a novel. I hope this helps you. I have not commented because I was waiting till the end.

    1. Allyson, thanks so much for the feedback. I must admit, I like “real” books too. I have a Kindle, but rarely use it anymore. I’ve not really read any web serials, so I probably need to find out how long they should be. 🙂

  3. Hi Bill,

    I voted that you continue to post here and if you decide to turn it into a novel- even better! Like Allyson mentioned, there’s nothing like turning the page of a good book but I also love the connections these platforms give us. Either way, it’s important to honor how you feel, to trust your inner guidance and allow the creative process to guide you wherever it may. Just know there are folks out here taking an interest in what you have to share, even if we don’t always leave a formal comment. 🙂 Lots of Love- Namaste

    1. Thank you. That is wonderful feedback. I guess my problem is that I couldn’t tell if the “pieces” I post work. Looks like I’ll just have to take the risk and see what happens. It is starting to feel like a book.

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